Westborough Korean: An All-Time Favorite

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Dinner at Westborough Korean

I had this post in draft limbo for over a year, and yet, this was the first place I wanted to write about. One of our all-time favorite spots:

Westborough Korean Restaurant
in Westborough, MA (Central Mass).

Sometime ago during Christmastime, excited to come in for some hot food, (in both senses of the word).

It is only fair to warn you that, for the time being, I remain a mere novice enthusiast in the world of Korean cuisine. I have only been to places in Toronto, South Florida, only a spot or two in NY, and some in MA. I have a long road ahead of me with destinations like the LA Koreatown and, well, Seoul itself placing high in my travel priorities. I will even share the fact that my very first exposure to Korean cuisine was not until I was of college-age, I believe. Many a moon ago, I attended for the nth time in my life the Epcot® International Food & Wine Festival, one of my family’s favorite excuses for a Disney trip. A new kiosk was setup between China and the African Outpost for Korean food. I ordered a small dish of Korean BBQ, and this small, seemingly-unglamorous step was the stepping stone that embarked me on a journey of love for both Korean food and its culture—and yes, Korean dramas and K-Pop, but that is besides the current point. Before this, I was unaware of Korean cuisine and its deliciousness.

I first came across Westborough Korean—let us call it WK for brevity—through a handful of online reviews that led me and my sister to this small, somewhat hidden dive. There is actually another Korean restaurant of sorts, Sapporo Restaurant, essentially across the street from WK. Sapporo has the entertaining option of grilling tables where you can cook your own meats and veggies, a characteristic trait of Korean restaurants. Although good, Sapporo is more along the lines of the typical commercial, more readily available restaurant, with higher prices and more widely-known menu items, plus the fact that Sapporo is both a Korean BBQ and Sushi Restaurant. It’s good, but compared to WK, there is a trade-off between brand/appearance and menu diversity versus richness of the meal plus bang for your buck. It’s an amusing note to point out that both places close one day a week, with Sapporo closing on Mondays, and Westborough Korean closing on Tuesdays, so worst case scenario, if you miss one you can still attend the other.

At WK, the food is plentiful, rich and varied in flavor. The meals are preceded by an arrangement of banchan, multiple small side dishes that provide for an overall wholesome experience. Banchan consist of items including but not limited to kimchi, spinach, potatoes, candied lotus roots, cubed radish kimchi, sweet potato noodles, soybean sprouts, mung bean jelly, cucumbers, broccoli, spicy eggplant, fish cakes… See below for articles on even more possibilities. Banchan is a particularly exciting element of Korean meals since you have a diverse assortment of flavors and nutritious elements from which you can pick and choose throughout the meal, a parallel to the bread and butter served during Western meals, but with much added culinary value, if you ask me.

Banchan at Westborough Korean. Depending on the day, they might be slightly different items.

The meals are served in a warm, small and intimate environment by a friendly staff we have been fortunate to get to know. The walls are decorated with subtle artwork covered in Korean lettering, in addition to one TV playing American shows opposite to another TV that plays Korean programming such as the famed Korean dramas or game shows. I particularly enjoy looking at that latter TV when the news come up, trying to figure out what the hangul captions are describing about a particular event in their own side of the world or even on our interlacing politics.

Fam with our friend Ann.
Dave and I and little kid peering from the left side of the picture.

A review wouldn’t be complete without suggestions on the must-get items from the menu. My family and I are creatures of habit and, once we find the items that make us fall in love with a place, it’s tough to dissuade us from venturing much further. One day, though, Dave and I will undergo the task of trying out every other delicious item on the menu… Some other time, some other day… For now, the two items we simply cannot do without at WK are the Dolsot Bi Bim Bap and the spicy Pork Bulgogi. These two alone provide the nutrition and flavor we crave for at a great price we can enjoy between four people and feel fully satisfied with. When we go with more people or even feel particularly “starved”, we add the Galbi Gui (to die for), and the Kimchi Pancake (Kimchijeon) as appetizer. I would highly suggest to enjoy yourself as well and get some soju, a drink which I particularly love. While it resembles sake, it holds a sweeter and softer flavor, which personally makes it a lot more pleasant for my particular palette—I typically struggle a bit to drink sake; by contrast, I am always eager to order soju, and like sake, it is also served in similarly small-sized servings.

To this day, Westborough Korean retains the title as one of our all-time favorite food spots to go to, independent of cuisine labels.

Kimchijeon with scallions and sauce, cut into slices like a small pizza pie.
Platter of spicy pork bulgogi on the left plus two stone bowls of bibimbap. Red gochujang sauce being drizzled on the second bowl.
The staff that makes it all happen.

On a somewhat sad note, this was one of my pseudo-attempts at bibimbap to help me through my withdrawal from WK, back when we had moved out of the area… I will not be sharing said wanna-be recipe, though.

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Withdrawal-induced dish cooked in remembrance of an actual bibimbap dish.

But, I will be sharing an actual bibimbap recipe by Maangchi, as seen in the video below.

Bibimbap Video Recipe by Maangchi:

Happy Spring?
-Kika


Bonus links, on banchan:

 

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Late Fall in Bartlett’s Orchard, Richmond, MA

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Picking McIntosh & Paula Red Apples

Dear Blag,

Happy Travel Tuesday! The winter season has finally begun which makes… Travel a bit harder……… Yesterday we woke up to the sight of cars buried in the fluffy, sparkly, wondrous blankets of freshly-fallen snow, in what was the second—third? I’ve lost track—big snow of the season. Forever a mystery, shoveling snow is actually a rather fun and enjoyable workout for me. Perhaps this further exhibits my oddity of character, or it could be that ’tis simply a sign that I am yet to be burdened by the ownership and constant maintenance of a driveway—but then again, ¿Por qué no los dos?

But as the days go by and transition from Winter Wonderland into a frigid, slushy underworld of wet messiness, let us reminisce over the embracing climate of early fall.

{Harp sounds of reminiscence play}

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Blue skies over the Berkshire Mountains

Back in September, amidst the temperate weather of Western Mass, we had ventured into the tamed wilderness of the Berkshires, an orchard field amongst the fluffy greenery of our mountains—I know I’m overusing the word “fluffy,” but everything’s just fluffy around here. There was even a morning where I felt like a Disney princess as I drove past a deer jumping around in a field, arrived at work and saw two foxes just chilling in the parking lot, and then on the way home almost hit a bunny by the side of the road. (The bunny was fine, it simply hopped back into the shrubs… I might not be the most graceful princess, though). I digress.

Bartlett’s Orchard is one of several orchards in the area, though it’s the only one we’ve been to yet, and so far so good! You go through the store front first, where they showcase several of their own grown fresh produce, then inside a variety of products and souvenirs for travelers, but the stars being obviously their apple cider and apple cider donuts, which are uber good—we’ve actually had the chance to attend tastings of the local orchards’ donuts and apple cider, and Bartlett’s are still in my top two, not sure I can decide…

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Bartlett’s Orchard in Richmond, MA
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Local Cheeses! Smoked, Jack, and Aged Sharp Cheddar
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Painting and… Oils?
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They grow Eggplants!
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Green Zebras??
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They grow Cayenne Peppers!
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Delicious Apple Cider Donuts!

Next, la pièce de résistance: You purchase your apple bag (choose your size) and off to the back, where the fields of trees decorated with red orbs like Christmas ornaments—BY NEWTON, IT’S ALMOST CHRISTMAS! (Twice as relevant ’cause birthday and gravity? Just… ok, back to the story)—pose their foliage like late summer nymphs. {Sigh} They’re a beautiful sight, and there’s something rather magical and childlike about picking your own fruit—indeed, this was my first time picking fruit—and not to mention, the taste can’t be paralleled by your typical grocery store purchase.

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David Picking Apples
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Paula Red Apple

Dave and I came in with the intent of picking our own apples for our first apple pie, so we asked the store clerk what apples he suggested for such an endeavor. At the time, it was earlier in the season, and the ideal apples for apple pie were not yet in season, so he suggested we use McIntosh. Boy oh boy were these apples delicious and juicy. Nothing like the apples we typically get at the grocery store. We also got some Paula Reds which were amazing too. Sadly, the latter did not last as long as the former, so by the time we made the apple pie, we only used McIntosh.

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Back to the cold now, but hey, at least their store is open year-round. Time for some hot apple cider? I think yes, my good sir/ma’am.

Happy Shoveling,
Kika & Dave.

References

[1] Bartlett’s Apple Orchard and Farm Market Website, http://www.bartlettsorchard.com/